AMERICAN KANG DUK WON KARATE

Self-Defense


The ultimate goal of American Kang Duk Won is to be able to defend yourself, your family, or other innocent persons against an attacker. In order to reach this goal, you must be physically and mentally prepared at all times. By training diligently, you can develop a series of coordinated movements that will be useful in a self-defense situation. You should attempt to master both defensive and offensive maneuvers. Often times, you cannot wait for an attack to begin, especially when you are heavily outnumbered or in defense of your home. At such times, even though the techniques are offensive, you are still acting in self-defense.

To say that self-defense techniques are divided into two categories, hard techniques and soft techniques, may be an oversimplification. There are, however, techniques which are definitely "soft" and should be used as such. Wristholds, break-aways, and armlocks are some examples of soft techniques and are used when you are not in any danger of being severely injured.

Hard techniques, such as striking the eyes, ear slaps, or groin strikes, should only be used when you are in danger of being severely injured or killed or when a weapon is involved.

There are many techniques that fall in between hard and soft and should be used accordingly. An elbow lock, for example, is a soft technique that can become hard if the elbow is forced to the point of dislocation. One basic rule to remember is that you must never take any extreme action without being morally justified.

In practicing self-defense techniques, it is important to analyze each move and understand the principle. You may not be attacked in exactly the same way as you are in practice. You should be prepared for different situations by using variations of the technique.

A half-front facing posture, formed with approximately 70% of the body weight resting on the back leg (Back Stance), is preferable in most self-defense situations. This 70/30 stance exposes fewer targets to your opponent.


"Self Defense" is an excerpt from American Kang Duk Won KARATE by Robert C. Lawlor and Frank A. Palumbo, Jr.


Elements of Self-Defense

  1. Be sure you are morally justified before initiating any self-defense technique. Extreme measures should only be taken when necessary.

  2. Remember, the most important part of self-defense is the element of surprise. Your opponent cannot guard against a technique if he does not expect it.

  3. Awareness is one of your primary self-defense weapons - train yourself to be aware of your surroundings.

  4. Try to avoid any situation that could be considered risky.

  5. Walk, look, and act positive. Remember, the more vulnerable you seem, the more likely you are to be a target.

  6. Never underestimate your opponent. Always assume he is dangerous.

  7. Train your body to move and turn as a unit, not in isolated parts.

  8. Keep your techniques simple. Techniques that work well in the training hall under ideal conditions, may be ineffective if the ground is slippery, rough, or bumpy.

  9. Be careful with footwork that is too complicated, such as high kicks, as balance is difficult when only one foot is contact with the ground.

  10. Do not commit yourself to one technique. If your first technique is not effective, be ready to use another immediately.

  11. Deliver your strikes or kicks to your assailant's vital areas (anatomical weak points), such as groin or solar plexus.

  12. After subduing your opponent, never lose sight of him and be constantly alert for a continuation of his attack.

  13. Practice techniques until they become automatic because you will not usually have time to stop and think of what to do in a self-defense situation.

  14. In practicing self-defense techniques, it is important to analyze each move and understand the principle. You may not be attacked in exactly the same way as you are in practice. You should be prepared for different situations by using variations of the technique.

  15. Always ask yourself the question, why risk it, before doing anything that could put you in a risky situation.

  16. If you are attacked, Yell Fire to attract attention.


"Elements of Self Defense Explained" is an excerpt from American Kang Duk Won KARATE by Robert C. Lawlor and Frank A. Palumbo, Jr.


More information can be obtained from:

American Kang Duk Won Karate, P.O. Box 151, Watertown, NY 13601




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